Tag Archives: chemistry

Chefs Rely on Ohaus to Teach Ingredient Consistency and Portioning

foodworld_penncollege_bodyphoto3Accuracy. Consistency. Reliability. These are the words that best describe Ohaus and the kinds of standards that are always top of mind when they’re designing their products. Their unwavering commitment to high-quality and durability makes them a staple in almost every industry so it’s no surprise that the students enrolled in The Pennsylvania College of Technology’s School of Hospitality’s Baking & Pastry Arts program are finding success with Ohaus balances.

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Ohaus Brews Up Perfection With Yonkers Brewing Company

You already know Ohaus has perfected the science of mass measurement with their state-of-the-art balances and scales. They’re constantly improving their capabilities and functions as well as ensuring their products are easy to use. Another field that Ohaus continues to raise the bar in is water analysis and testing pH levels. Their Starter Series line of water analysis products all contains intuitive software that is both straightforward and highly accurate. The Yonkers Brewing Company, located in Yonkers, New York, took notice of this and decided to use Ohaus’ equipment for their brewing process.

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First True-Color Super Resolution Microscopy Technique Developed

Tmicroscopy imageo say there have been many advancements in the field of microscopy since the development of the first compound microscope by Zaccharias Jansen in the late 16th century is an understatement. Jansen and his father, Dutch spectacle makers, built the first microscope by using three draw tubes with lenses inserted into the ends of the flanking tubes. They discovered a much larger image than expected; much larger than simple magnifying glass provided. The very first compound microscopes only magnified images between 6x – 9x. Microscopes of today can magnify images to the nanometer.

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Winter Science Fun

Nature-SnowflakeToday marks the official first day of winter so we’ve gathered a few science experiments you can try! From melting ice to creating winter in a glass, you and your students will have a blast with these experiments that help you celebrate the winter season.

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What You Probably Didn’t Know About the Periodic Table

Shared from National Geographic

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Did you know there’s a prank hiding in one of the most widely recognized charts in science history? Look closely at the bottom row of the periodic table of elements…still don’t see it? It’s staring right at you at element 94, plutonium.

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What Would Mendeleev Say About Synthetic Elements?

Dmitri Mendeleev was an excellent teacher and searched mendeleev statuefor ways to make chemistry easier for his students. He began arranging the chemical elements in groups with similar characteristics which developed into today’s periodic chart of the elements. Mendeleev’s original chart included 63 elements; today we know 118. Though puzzled by the gaps in his first table, Mendeleev was confident the table was right and the missing elements to fit in the gaps would show up … sometime.

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Cooking with NGSS

Despite only 13 states and the District of Columbia having formally adopted the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), many school classes_labdistricts in non-acting states are not waiting on their governments. We are hearing more and more reports from teachers in Florida, Pennsylvania and Wyoming that their schools have adopted NGSS in some format despite few (and sometimes abandoned) legislation discussion. Considering all of this, at Fisher Science Education, we thought it would be a good exercise to task ourselves with an assignment more and more science teachers across America are being asked to complete: rewrite an existing lab activity following the NGSS formula. How did we do it and what can we share? Read on to find out and then follow the web link to reference and use our developed lab in your classroom!

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Sun Protection Makes Vacation Sense

sunscreenThose warming rays of the sun have a well-deserved Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde reputation. While they generate vitamin D and make us feel great, they also cause skin damage with UV radiation. UV-A radiation prematurely ages skin and contributes to skin cancer. UV-B radiation creates the tans we love and burns we hate.

 
Our skin’s natural protection, melanin — associated with the amount of pigment in the skin — is not enough. So how can you enjoy the outdoors safely?

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The Smell of Money

An estimated $30 billion in illegal cash crosses U.S. borders into Mexico annually. Border Patrol has the daunting job of finding it before it leaves, and last year, U.S. officials seized $106 million. The Department of Homeland Security recently put out a public call for currency detection devices. KWJ Engineering responded with a money-sniffing instrument. The Bulk Currency Detection System (BCDS) relies upon gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

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