Category Archives: Teaching

National Engineering Week: Engineers who paved the way

As this year’s National Engineering Week comes to a close we thought it would be a good idea to take a moment and recognize some engineers who’s contributions impacted society in a major way. Without their tenacity and innovation, many aspects of our daily lives that have become second nature to us would simply not exist. These engineers and inventors had to overcome great adversity to make a difference in the world and we are grateful for their commitment to improving the lives of others. This post features Mark Dean, Peter Goldmark, Igor Sikorsky and Larry Page.

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National Engineering Week 2016: A Week of Engineering Activities

This week we celebrate engineers all around the country and the contributions they’ve made to society. In the U.S., National Engineering Week usually falls on the same week as George Washington’s birthday to pay tribute to his surveying and map making skills in the late 1700’s. It has been said that Washington surveyed over 200 tracts of land and is considered the first engineer for his work. In honor of National Engineering Week and all of Washington’s contributions, we’ve gathered a week’s worth of engineering activities you can try at home or in the classroom!

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Making the Invisible, Visible..with iPads

This is a guest post from Maggie Keeler (@KeelerMS). Shared with the permission of our friends at Swift Optical.

Microscope work in science class is often a solitary endeavor. Traditionally, one student searches to find a seemingly invisible organism while patiently waiting for the teacher to come confirm that they’ve found it. Not anymore! With the MotiConnect App from Motic, this isolated experience becomes collaborative. MotiConnect allows you to connect up to six iPads wirelessly to a Moticam X camera or digital microscope with Moticam software. Each student is then able to capture images, record videos, annotate, and measure images from the microscope.

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Helping Students Become STEM-credible

Thermo Fisher Scientific at Renaissance Charter SchoolFisher Science Education is committed to promoting STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education in schools all across the country. As demand for jobs in these fields continues to grow, it is important that students possess the necessary skills to face the challenges of the 21st century with confidence and innovation. As part of our corporate responsibility efforts, we also believe in making the world healthier, cleaner and safer and are always encouraging students to experience science safely. With this goal in mind we teamed up with our parent company Thermo Fisher Scientific to create a program that brings STEM and lab safety into the classroom like never before.

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Winter Science Fun

Nature-SnowflakeToday marks the official first day of winter so we’ve gathered a few science experiments you can try! From melting ice to creating winter in a glass, you and your students will have a blast with these experiments that help you celebrate the winter season.

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What Would Mendeleev Say About Synthetic Elements?

Dmitri Mendeleev was an excellent teacher and searched mendeleev statuefor ways to make chemistry easier for his students. He began arranging the chemical elements in groups with similar characteristics which developed into today’s periodic chart of the elements. Mendeleev’s original chart included 63 elements; today we know 118. Though puzzled by the gaps in his first table, Mendeleev was confident the table was right and the missing elements to fit in the gaps would show up … sometime.

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What Does Your “Selfie” Say About You?

The Millennials are often called the “Selfie-generation.” They pride themselves on usingselfie those selfies to create their personal online brand — defining who they are, what they like and what they stand for. But even if you aren’t a Millennial, it’s likely that you use Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram and you’ve probably taken at least a few selfies. While some credit the selfie as pure narcissism, others consider them a form of self-expression and a way to control how others perceive us online. But what do those selfies really say about you? How do others perceive you based on your social media photos?

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STEM Career: STEM Teacher

Every great student requires a great teacher. The fields about which we have written, and the fields about teacher 2which we will continue to write, all encourage students to begin taking STEM courses in high school. These STEM courses need good teachers to teach them. If learning about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is what you want to do in college, and then you want to pass that knowledge on to future generations, consider becoming a STEM teacher.

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Sisters e S.T.E.A.M. Program

Dear MirroDSC_0757r,
Straight or Curly? Why won’t this frizzy hair go away? I want to wear lipstick but what color is right for me? I put on deodorant every morning, but I’m still a sweaty mess by noon. No one understands my dilemmas and my reputation is everything.
Sincerely,
The Middle School Girl

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The Name Game: Brontosaurus vs. Apatosaurus

Dinosaurs firbrontosaurusst appeared during the Triassic Period of the Mesozoic Era over 245 to 208 million years ago and dominated the planet for 135 million years. Among the largest were the herbivorous sauropods known for their long necks and tails and immense size. For generations of children, the most famous of these giants was the Brontosaurus, or “thunder lizard.”  Continue reading “The Name Game: Brontosaurus vs. Apatosaurus” »