Category Archives: Life Science

Demystifying De-Extinction

Every species becomes extinct eventually. Animals such as the woolly mammoth and passenger pigeon are one of the many species who failed to leave behind descendants that could adapt to their surroundings and carry on their genetic lineage. But what if there was a process that could bring extinct species back to life? Scientists are getting closer to making this a reality thanks to de-extinction. Continue reading “Demystifying De-Extinction” »

What Makes Fireflies Glow?

Pretty soon, when you look outside at night you will notice the intermittent glow of fireflies throughout your backyard. This is one of the sure-tell signs that summer is finally here and while these twinkling bugs can keep us in awe for what seems like hours at a time, there is some serious chemistry happening in their bodies. Continue reading “What Makes Fireflies Glow?” »

How Dogs Find Their Way Home Without a GPS

The migration patterns of certain animals have always been a mystery to scientists. Species such as birds and humpback whales demonstrate precision and consistency every time they migrate to a new climate with whales migrating as far as 3,000 miles to the exact same feeding area every year! (I need a GPS to go just 10 miles up the road.) Another animal who demonstrated this impressive feat was a sheepdog from Wales who about a month ago traveled 240 miles to his previous owners home.

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35 Stunning Images of America’s National Parks

As we mentioned in a previous post, the National Park Service is turning 100 years old this August! What better way to celebrate nature’s greatest achievements than with a look at some of the most amazing photos taken of some of our national parks?! Here are our favorite 35 images of America’s national parks.

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15 Images That Will Leave You in Awe of Science

This is an image of oil paint floating in a solution of water and methylated spirits.: When you think of science what usually comes to mind? It’s doubtful that colorful imagery or bright, exciting chemical reactions that look like they’re going to jump out at you from the page are top of your list. Believe it or not, all of these images below are in fact science reactions captured by some of the world’s greatest photographers. Read on and be prepared to be completely in awe of science!

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The National Park Service turns 100

yosemite nat parkOn August 25, 2016 The National Park Service will be turning 100 years old. To get ready for this huge milestone in the organization’s history, they have been partnering with institutions across the country on different programs, events and activities to help increase awareness and support for America’s 407 national parks. Now more than ever, it’s important we encourage students to go outdoors and explore everything that nature has to offer and thanks to the National Park Service, we have been able to do that for almost 100 years.

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Giving transplant patients a second chance to soar

According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, 121,357 people are currently waiting for an organ transplant in the U.S. alone. Some of these people are probably your loved ones, your neighbor, your best friend or your co-worker. Organ transplants have the possibility to extend the lives of thousands of people each year and it has been Thermo Fisher Scientific’s mission to advance the field of transplantation and improve the quality of life for both patients and their families. Read on to find out how one transplant recipient benefited from our diagnostic tools and technologies and has committed her life to paying it forward.

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Can Soap Bubbles Predict Tropical Storms?

Meteorology is a complex and imprecise science. Despite technological advancements, forecasting volatile weather patterns, such as tropical storms, remains a challenge as it involves predicting numerous dynamic atmospheric and environmental interactions. Results of recent research however, have shown that soap bubbles may provide a simple, inexpensive and effective means for predicting the strength of hurricanes and typhoons.

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Pupils Give Clues to Ecological Niche

Domestic_dog__Cani_eyeLooking deeply into the eyes of your pet cat, one thing is immediately obvious. Assuming that your feline is easygoing and placid, doesn’t mind up-close-and-personal encounters with humans and is not struggling to get as far away as possible, you would be struck by its pupils. They are not like yours. They are not like a goat’s, either. As it turns out, that is all for the best.

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First True-Color Super Resolution Microscopy Technique Developed

Tmicroscopy imageo say there have been many advancements in the field of microscopy since the development of the first compound microscope by Zaccharias Jansen in the late 16th century is an understatement. Jansen and his father, Dutch spectacle makers, built the first microscope by using three draw tubes with lenses inserted into the ends of the flanking tubes. They discovered a much larger image than expected; much larger than simple magnifying glass provided. The very first compound microscopes only magnified images between 6x – 9x. Microscopes of today can magnify images to the nanometer.

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