Category Archives: Holiday

Happy Pythagorean Theorem Day!

pythagoras-sketchDid you forget to get a card?  We don’t know if the card store will have something for today, but that doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate!

Pythagorean Theorem Day or Pythagoras Theorem Day is celebrated when the sum of the squares of the first two digits in a date equals the square of the last digit in the date. In this case: August 15, 2017 (8/15/17 or 15/8/17): 8² + 15² = 17². The next instance of this special day won’t happen until December 16th, 2020…so don’t miss your chance to celebrate today!

So let’s refresh…what is the Pythagorean Theorem?

From Wikipediareal-life-applications-pythagorean-theorem_672e4a5e3a2f7d7 In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras’s theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. The theorem can be written as an equation relating the lengths of the sides a, b and c, often called the “Pythagorean equation”:  a2+b2=cwhere c represents the length of the hypotenuse and a and b the lengths of the triangle’s other two sides.

Although it is often argued that knowledge of the theorem predates him, the theorem is named after the ancient Greek mathematician Pythagoras (c. 570–495 BC) as it is he who, by tradition, is credited with its first recorded proof. There is some evidence that Babylonian mathematicians understood the formula, although little of it indicates an application within a mathematical framework. Mesopotamian, Indian and Chinese mathematicians all discovered the theorem independently and, in some cases, provided proofs for special cases.

The theorem has been given numerous proofs – possibly the most for any mathematical theorem. They are very diverse, including both geometric proofs and algebraic proofs, with some dating back thousands of years. The theorem can be generalized in various ways, including higher-dimensional spaces, to spaces that are not Euclidean, to objects that are not right triangles, and indeed, to objects that are not triangles at all, but n-dimensional solids. The Pythagorean theorem has attracted interest outside mathematics as a symbol of mathematical abstruseness, mystique, or intellectual power; popular references in literature, plays, musicals, songs, stamps and cartoons abound.

So how to celebrate?  Try these ideas:

  • earn more about the Pythagoras Theorem and its real life applications.
  • Celebrate the day by eating foods that are cut in right angle triangles. Make a pizza or bake a cake or cookies in the shape of a right triangle. Or just your PB&J will work too!
  • Since the holiday depends on a unique date pattern, why not spend the day learning about other special date patterns- sequential, repetitive, or palindrome for example?

Small ways to thank your teacher for an awesome school year

During Teacher Appreciation Week, we compiled a list of some easy yet thoughtful gifts to show teachers just how much we appreciate all of their hard work. Now as the school year is coming to a close, it’s the perfect time to remind teachers just how much they’re valued and that all of their efforts don’t go unnoticed. Here are some small ways to thank your teacher for an awesome school year! Continue reading “Small ways to thank your teacher for an awesome school year” »

Some humor to get you through the end of the school year

I remember having to wait until lunch and the end of school.: It’s (finally) that time of year where school is starting to wind down and hopefully your schedule is filling up with some time for you to enjoy the warm weather! This time of year also makes for some awesome humor that perfectly sums up how everyone is feeling in these final weeks before the summer break you all deserve. We gathered some of the best quotes and memes to help you get through your final days of the school year, and for those of you who are lucky enough to already be done, here’s a good laugh anyways! Continue reading “Some humor to get you through the end of the school year” »

The Best Gifts for Teacher Appreciation Week


“To the world you may be just a teacher, but to your students you are a HERO!”
 This quote reminds us that the work teachers do every single day is something that should be rewarded and appreciated by everyone who’s lives they’ve impacted. We found some of the best ways to show teachers your appreciation for them this week that are thoughtful yet simple to create!

Continue reading “The Best Gifts for Teacher Appreciation Week” »

Celebrating Earth Day

Starting in 1970, Earth Day was created to celebrate environmental protection efforts all over the U.S. Now it is observed in over 190 countries and is the largest secular holiday in the world! To help you make the most of this day with your students, we gathered some awesome Earth Day activities that are hands-on and interactive while also reinforcing environmentally friendly concepts such as recycling, pollution and composting. Check out these activities below to try in the classroom or even in your home!

Continue reading “Celebrating Earth Day” »

Winter Science Fun

Nature-SnowflakeToday marks the official first day of winter so we’ve gathered a few science experiments you can try! From melting ice to creating winter in a glass, you and your students will have a blast with these experiments that help you celebrate the winter season.

Continue reading “Winter Science Fun” »

EEWW! That’s Yucky!

If any of your students have turned away when peering into a microscope, they may be tmummyurning away from science. Rather than being intrigued, some elementary students are adversely affected by what they see in a microscope. Unidentifiable squiggly things in a drop of tap water, the magnified eyes of a fly, the prickly legs of a garden spider…any or all of these could dampen a young child’s curiosity about the world around him.

Continue reading “EEWW! That’s Yucky!” »