Category Archives: Environment

How Dogs Find Their Way Home Without a GPS

The migration patterns of certain animals have always been a mystery to scientists. Species such as birds and humpback whales demonstrate precision and consistency every time they migrate to a new climate with whales migrating as far as 3,000 miles to the exact same feeding area every year! (I need a GPS to go just 10 miles up the road.) Another animal who demonstrated this impressive feat was a sheepdog from Wales who about a month ago traveled 240 miles to his previous owners home.

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35 Stunning Images of America’s National Parks

As we mentioned in a previous post, the National Park Service is turning 100 years old this August! What better way to celebrate nature’s greatest achievements than with a look at some of the most amazing photos taken of some of our national parks?! Here are our favorite 35 images of America’s national parks.

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Can Soap Bubbles Predict Tropical Storms?

Meteorology is a complex and imprecise science. Despite technological advancements, forecasting volatile weather patterns, such as tropical storms, remains a challenge as it involves predicting numerous dynamic atmospheric and environmental interactions. Results of recent research however, have shown that soap bubbles may provide a simple, inexpensive and effective means for predicting the strength of hurricanes and typhoons.

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A New Type of Engineering Could Save Earths Climate

Shared from Tech Insider and BBC News.

bubblesWe all know Bill Nye is not shy about sharing his opinions on controversial subjects, and his views on climate change are no different. In an interview with National Geographic a couple of weeks ago he discussed a type of engineering that could have the potential to combat climate change in a major way.

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Baby Tortoises are Back!

baby tortoisePity the plight of the poor Galapagos tortoises. The past several hundred years have been tough. Their population, once estimated up to 250,000, has dropped precipitously. Whalers and pirates in the 1600s, 1700s and later, found these ancient creatures a meaty and easy-to-maintain food source for their voyages — tortoises could survive for long periods on a ship without food and water.

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Is Climate Change Spreading Infectious Diseases?

Buruli ulcer is not an affliction disease strainyou would like anyone to contract. Caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, it produces a toxin which necrotizes tissue and hampers immune response. Up to 6000 cases are reported annually to the World Health Organization from 15 countries. Though 80 percent of cases can be cured by antibiotics if caught early, late reporting is typical, leading to a high proportion of permanent disability.

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Burrowing Animals May Have Stabilized Earth’s Oxygen

The presence of oxygeburrowingn in the Earth’s atmosphere is a critical component to life as we know it. But how did our atmosphere come into existence? What events created the oxygen rich air that we breathe? Scientists think that the answer lies in the lowliest of creatures; creatures that we don’t even notice unless we pull back the muck and ‘dig deep’.

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Return of an Extinct Congo Monkey!

First observed in the forests of the Republic of the Congo in 1887, the rare Old World Bouvier’scongo monkey red colobus monkeys (Pilicolobus bouvieri) were distinguished by their reddish fur, large eyes, white chin and whiskers and long tail. Originally considered a sub-species of Pennant’s Colobus monkeys native to Central Africa, they were reclassified as a distinct species in 2007.

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Study Finds Human Pathogens in Gray Seals

BM-coomon-seal-005Zoonotic, or cross-species, diseases have plagued humans for centuries—from Ebola to malaria to bubonic plague. Scientists had believed that transmission of infectious diseases stopped at the water’s edge, making spread of disease between land and sea animals impossible. A recent study to collect health data on Scotland’s gray seals, however, revealed elevated levels of a human pathogen, shattering the previous understanding of pathogenic transmission

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