Category Archives: Chemistry

What Makes Fireflies Glow?

Pretty soon, when you look outside at night you will notice the intermittent glow of fireflies throughout your backyard. This is one of the sure-tell signs that summer is finally here and while these twinkling bugs can keep us in awe for what seems like hours at a time, there is some serious chemistry happening in their bodies. Continue reading “What Makes Fireflies Glow?” »

Cotton Candy Could be Useful for Science

Cotton candy has come to be known as a carnival food staple practically all over the world. Kids and adults alike always seem to be completely fascinated by the feathery treat’s unique lighter than air properties. Believe it or not, the chemistry behind making cotton candy might prove to be useful in laboratory research to help grow new tissues in the lab.

Continue reading “Cotton Candy Could be Useful for Science” »

15 Images That Will Leave You in Awe of Science

This is an image of oil paint floating in a solution of water and methylated spirits.: When you think of science what usually comes to mind? It’s doubtful that colorful imagery or bright, exciting chemical reactions that look like they’re going to jump out at you from the page are top of your list. Believe it or not, all of these images below are in fact science reactions captured by some of the world’s greatest photographers. Read on and be prepared to be completely in awe of science!

Continue reading “15 Images That Will Leave You in Awe of Science” »

A Teacher’s Guide to Coffee

Did you know that coffee is the world’s second most valuable traded commodity? With almost 2.25 billion cups of coffee consumed every day it’s no surprise that people all over the world can’t get enough of the delicious beverage and research shows teachers feel the same way, with 56% choosing coffee as their drink of choice.  Also, the type of bean used can depend on how much caffeine is in a cup with Robusta varieties containing the most amount. Check out these and more facts below in our Teacher’s Guide to Coffee infographic!

Continue reading “A Teacher’s Guide to Coffee” »

Chefs Rely on Ohaus to Teach Ingredient Consistency and Portioning

foodworld_penncollege_bodyphoto3Accuracy. Consistency. Reliability. These are the words that best describe Ohaus and the kinds of standards that are always top of mind when they’re designing their products. Their unwavering commitment to high-quality and durability makes them a staple in almost every industry so it’s no surprise that the students enrolled in The Pennsylvania College of Technology’s School of Hospitality’s Baking & Pastry Arts program are finding success with Ohaus balances.

Continue reading “Chefs Rely on Ohaus to Teach Ingredient Consistency and Portioning” »

Ohaus Brews Up Perfection With Yonkers Brewing Company

You already know Ohaus has perfected the science of mass measurement with their state-of-the-art balances and scales. They’re constantly improving their capabilities and functions as well as ensuring their products are easy to use. Another field that Ohaus continues to raise the bar in is water analysis and testing pH levels. Their Starter Series line of water analysis products all contains intuitive software that is both straightforward and highly accurate. The Yonkers Brewing Company, located in Yonkers, New York, took notice of this and decided to use Ohaus’ equipment for their brewing process.

Continue reading “Ohaus Brews Up Perfection With Yonkers Brewing Company” »

First True-Color Super Resolution Microscopy Technique Developed

Tmicroscopy imageo say there have been many advancements in the field of microscopy since the development of the first compound microscope by Zaccharias Jansen in the late 16th century is an understatement. Jansen and his father, Dutch spectacle makers, built the first microscope by using three draw tubes with lenses inserted into the ends of the flanking tubes. They discovered a much larger image than expected; much larger than simple magnifying glass provided. The very first compound microscopes only magnified images between 6x – 9x. Microscopes of today can magnify images to the nanometer.

Continue reading “First True-Color Super Resolution Microscopy Technique Developed” »

Magnets and Cents

copper manganeseWith as plentiful as magnets are in our everyday lives– from the electronics and motors to our refrigerators covered in them – it’s hard to imagine that there are only a few metals that are naturally magnetic. As we become more gadget obsessed, our need for magnetic materials increases. And now researchers have made magnets out of two non-magnetic metals: copper and manganese. This discovery could be useful in microscopic electronics and sensors.

Continue reading “Magnets and Cents” »

Winter Science Fun

Nature-SnowflakeToday marks the official first day of winter so we’ve gathered a few science experiments you can try! From melting ice to creating winter in a glass, you and your students will have a blast with these experiments that help you celebrate the winter season.

Continue reading “Winter Science Fun” »

What You Probably Didn’t Know About the Periodic Table

Shared from National Geographic

94-Plutonium-Tile

Did you know there’s a prank hiding in one of the most widely recognized charts in science history? Look closely at the bottom row of the periodic table of elements…still don’t see it? It’s staring right at you at element 94, plutonium.

Continue reading “What You Probably Didn’t Know About the Periodic Table” »