Cotton Candy Could be Useful for Science

Cotton candy has come to be known as a carnival food staple practically all over the world. Kids and adults alike always seem to be completely fascinated by the feathery treat’s unique lighter than air properties. Believe it or not, the chemistry behind making cotton candy might prove to be useful in laboratory research to help grow new tissues in the lab.

The people over at bbc.com found in their post The amazing chemistry of candyfloss that researchers at Vanderbilt University are using cotton candy machines as part of an effort to create artificial tissues. Before using these types of machines, only 60-70% of their artificial cells were able to survive. Now they’ve been able to have 90% of the cells adhere to the new vessels created by the cotton candy machine!

The possibilities of being able to grow new cells and tissues are endless. This could mean a new organ for someone who is fighting for their life waiting for an organ donor or new bone cells for someone who is suffering from Osteoporosis.

 

To read the full article from BBC you can click here. What do you think of Vanderbilt’s use of cotton candy machines in the lab? Let us know in the comments below!

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